Francophone Africa gliding towards monarchy

EDITORIAL 28 Apr 2021
Francophone Africa gliding towards monarchy

The tragic death of one of Africa’s remaining long-serving presidents, Marshall Idriss Deby, has added one more proof of the determination of Francophone countries to transform their republics into monarchies.
Immediately after his death was announced by what was also immediately christened the military transitional council, Marshal Idriss Deby’s son, Mahamat Kaka, was named president of the transitional council.
Marshal Idriss Deby was however laid to rest over the week-end, allegedly having been shot dead while on a visit to troops at the frontline of the war against Islamic insurgents. Reports allege that this had virtually become a routine exercise for the president in his capacity as commander-chief of the armed forces.
We in this Newspaper sincerely join the rest of the world to express our sympathy mainly for the manner in which his life was terminated, because we recognize death as a promise to every living creature, especially man. Our concern here is however, why all what happened on that fateful day of the Marshal’s death has never been labelled and systematically condemned as a palace coup involving the military itself, most probably with an agenda more.
The April 20 incident is by all constitutional consideration a planned coup. Other-wise, the military could not on their own have gone ahead to name for itself a transitional council, knowing that there is adequate constitutional provision for such a transition under normal circumstances of a vacancy in the presidency. That, a number of countries of the central African region turned their attention away from the fact that it was a planned coup intended to enable another group of military men replace Idriss Deby and even went ahead to virtually recognize the junta, goes beyond an ordinary diplomatic act.
That, France was fully represented at the funeral by its president as chief mourner, also has more than can merely be described as a sincere expression of sympathy for a departed friend. The distant sign-post indicates the new direction of Francophone countries in their succession formula. We have already stated above that trends in the last few decades, particularly in Francophone Africa, show that these countries are already deep in their avowed process of transforming their republics into unconstitutional monarchies.
To prove our case, it would be pertinent for us to move back to the days of Jean Badel Bokassa, in the central African republic, who came in power through the barrel of the gun, and after several years in power, developed the notion of transforming that country from a republic to something else. He ended up making himself an Emperor. His plans however failed and since then, that Central African country has never seen stability despite its abundant wealth in mineral resources. The hand of France has always been discovered working behind the scene.
In the Democratic Republic of the Congo, whatever mechanism was applied by the big powers interested in the mineral resources, Kabila the father was gunned out of power and replaced by his son. Then in line, came Eyadema of Togo, whom even before his death had worked the way for his son to succeed him. This was followed by Bongo, who was successfully replaced by his son. And now it is the turn of Idris Deby and Chad.
The trend usually lays its foundation with longevity in power. And looking carefully at the record of presidents who continued to stay on in power, you can only count on former French speaking countries. We consider this a dangerous trend for an Africa that is looking forward to breaking out of the shell to face a competitive world in its numerous challenges. May it not come close to us.

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